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‘Among them Complicit’? Life and Politics in France's Black Communities, 1919–1939

‘Among them Complicit’? Life and Politics in France's Black Communities, 1919–1939

Chapter:
(p.55) Chapter 4 ‘Among them Complicit’? Life and Politics in France's Black Communities, 1919–1939
Source:
Africa in Europe
Author(s):
Jennifer Anne Boittin
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846318474.003.0004

This chapter explores relations among people of African descent in interwar France, considering the ways in which communities emerged out of negotiations among people of different backgrounds and the forms that politics took in that context. Focusing on the challenges faced by black political organisations under the leadership of Lamine Senghor and Tiémoko Garan Kouyaté in addressing France’s scattered and varied black population, it argues that black migrants – working class, intellectual, anti-imperialist, revolutionary or not – all found ways to theorise and politicise their connectivity, more or less explicitly. Everyday gestures, language and reactions in these communities were often also political, and those in the black community with revolutionary political ideologies were often just as concerned with the mundane. Migrants engaged in anti-imperialism and/or revolutionary politics, and those more interested in survival or creating a home in France, were connected by transnational practices.

Keywords:   anti-imperialism, black politics, France, Lamine Senghor, Tiémoko Garan Kouyaté, communities

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